Lastly, you could always order flowers or balloons and send to your recent nursing school graduate as a gift, and this will be a great way to show them you care. I listed this one last because, although it is very thoughtful and creative, flowers quickly die and balloons deflate. But it is still a wonderful option if you can’t think of anything else, and some people LOVE flowers, while others are more practical and would prefer to have a gift that will last more than a day or so.
After all of those years in school, what better to prepare for a new job than a quick getaway to some vacation spot? Some people like to get their recent graduate friends or family a quick vacation before they enter the workforce. You can pitch in with others, or simply buy a hotel room. Of course, it goes without saying that you’d better make sure they are interested in going, and will be able to do so.
There are some gifts that are a little more universal. For example, any nurse would likely appreciate a thoughtful card and a nice double walled vacuum sealed mug. I mean, who doesn’t drink water? And even if they already have one, it’s always nice to have one you can keep at home and one you can take on the go. I have 3, myself. One of the office, one for the car, and one at home.
There's books designed especially for the new nurse, quick reference guides and such: maybe a gift certificate to a large bookstore with a card that tells her to buy such a book for herself? Better than choosing the wrong one, and I love when someone has thought enough to tell me that's what they want for me, and I should choose A friend did that for me specifically for NON-nursing books: she said I had spent so long staring at textbooks, the Barnes and Noble giftcard was ONLY to be used on paperback fiction! Loved that.
After 2-4 years of tuition, textbooks, little to no income, and potential debt, cash is always great. Besides, cash (or check), is often a standard for most graduates. How much cash should you give? That completely depends on your relationship with the person, and your own financial means. If they are a son/daughter or best friend, you’ll probably give more. If they are a distant relative or acquaintance, probably less. $20-50 is usually acceptable for distant relationships, while $50-100 is usually a good range if you are closer. For very special people, there is no limit.

That time of year has come; your friend or family member has sacrificed so much for this moment: nursing school graduation. And that’s not including what’s next for them: the NCLEX . So why not surprise them with something they’ll actually want during this graduation season? Give them something that will make their transition from nursing student to nurse go a little more smoothly.  Here are ten great gifts for the graduating nursing student!
NRSNG Academy’s Cardiac course covers some of the most common diseases and most important information related to the Cardiovascular system. This system is responsible for moving the blood throughout your body. If it doesn’t work - well, it’s not good! We will show you how to identify any abnormalities in a patient and how to care for them confidently. We also break down some of the more complex topics and make them easy to understand! ">
When my parents asked me what I wanted for my nursing school graduation gift, I asked for a gift card to a scrub shop!  Most new nurses don’t have a lot of scrubs already–they may only have the scrubs with their school’s emblem stitched on.  So the gift of new scrubs is a very practical option!  I love Lydia’s Scrubs for their wide selection and reasonable prices, and it’s easy to order online.

ProFlowers received the highest numerical score in the proprietary J.D. Power 2015 Online Flower Retailer Satisfaction Report(sm). Report based on 2,000 responses measuring 4 online flower retailers and measures the opinions of consumers who made an online purchase in the past 12 months. Proprietary study results are based on experiences and perceptions of consumers surveyed February 2015. Your experiences may vary. Visit jdpower.com  

We first started using this when my daughter was 3 months old and around 12lbs. I had high hopes for this suit and was very disappointed when it didnt make a bit of difference to her sleep and I thought I'd wasted $40. My husband pointed out that it was huge on her and that it should prob be snug to make her feel like shes being held so I put it away and tried again a month later. At 4months and around 14lbs this suit helped somewhat with her sleep. Not a magic suit but still there was a marked improvement in her sleep on the nights she wore the suit. My daughter is now 5 months old and 16lbs and she sleeps great in this suit! Without the suit on she rolls on her stomach to sleep which worries me but in ... full review ">

Nurse gift throw blanket that can be personalized with name, date, medical facility or years of service. A keepsake gift for Nurse graduation gift, school nurse gift, registered nurse gift, nurse thank you gift, Nurse's Day and nurse retirement gift. Unique gift for nurse week celebration, achievement, and years of service for those in the medical field.
A unique gift I have received and given as a gift many times, is the Humanity Bracelet. It can be purchased in pewter, sterling or gold. It has seven, two sided links with the virtues: Loyalty, Unity, Passion, Joy, Kindness, Humor, Hope, Courage, Love, Trust, Honor, Family, Truth and Charity engraved on the links. 'Google' Humanity Bracelet for a variety of sites. The bracelet is a unique keepsake.
Your first 100 days at a new job could be daunting—unless you go in prepared. First Year Nurse places the wisdom and warnings of hundreds of experienced nurses right at your fingertips. You’ll learn all about how to start off on the right foot, plan and prioritize, communicate with your colleagues, cope with challenging patients, keep your energy up (and stress down), and set a course for professional growth. Best of all, you’ll be inspired by the compassion, insight, and enthusiasm you’ll find on every page of this charming, helpful book.

Tired of the pace and noise of life near London and longing for a better place to raise their young children, Mary J. MacLeod (known to all as Julia) and her husband encountered their dream while vacationing on a remote island in the Scottish Hebrides. Enthralled by its windswept beauty, they soon were the proud owners of a near-derelict croft house—a farmer’s stone cottage—on “a small acre” of land. Mary assumed duties as the island’s district nurse. Call the Nurse is her account of the first enchanted years she and her family spent there, coming to know its folk as both patients and friends.

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